Elysia

I went over seas for a dance competition and stayed at a recently acquired friends place. I thought he was safe and a genuine person so as he opened up his house for me during the week in between two competitions on the weekend. As the week progressed I opened up to him more and more about my life (parents had just divorced) and also being a Christian we had many conversations about sex before marriage and I expressed always very clearly how I didn’t want to loose my virginity before marriage. It became a thing that at night time we drank and then hooked up in my bedroom then he would go to sleep and we communicated that it would be just during the week we would allow this to happen and it wouldn’t again. He had also tried three times to have sex and I told him no. On the last night we we did the same and I woke up the next morning not remembering anything but walking into a black room and felt I had been invaded. I then asked him if we did it and he said yes. I came home and feeling shattered took counselling and just told a few people who were close and about a month later went into a relationship where we had sex all the time. My mum found out about having sex with my boyfriend and not about the rape and kicked me out of home so I now live with my dad. Guys are still unsafe to me but I now have the confidence to share my story more and hopefully inspire more women to stand up for theirselves from even a day to day basis walking in the street or when on dates or at work. anywhere. I learnt this first hand and it probably took this situation to realise life can be unsafe, you have to think for yourself and always respect yourself, but overall un-consented sex isn’t okay no matter the state.

name

i have posted on here once before. just been reading a few posts and thought to myself “where do these dipsh*ts come from?” i’m happy and proud to say that all of my guy friends are respectful and if any female gets harassed they instantly stand up for her

name

in the afternoons i often ride my bike home. at my high school the people that ride to and from school are allowed to wear the sports uniform as it is easier to ride without the skirt or dress pants. the sports uniform is uni-sex so not particularly flattering. just a white polo and shorts which go about 3/4 down the thigh. i always cross near a bus stop on a busy road so there are traffic flights so that the bus can keep moving to pick and drop off passengers. while i’m waiting i often have one of my feet on the ground and one a pedal so that i’m ready to start riding and the shorts ride up a bit because of it. often if people need to cross after the bus has gone you are able to. sometimes as i wait for the lights to change early 20s or younger who are driving by yell put through their window. i’ve never understood what they’ve said but because it has been in mine or my friends direction i can assume something along the lines of what they’ve said. it not only disturbed me that their attention is not on the road and that they’re driving safely but that they would take to time to roll down their windows an yell stuff at girls who are at the very least five years younger than them

Charlotte

I work at McDonald’s. Does it ever occur to others that it is odd that women just have to serve the customers, and the men have to do the ‘hard work’ and make the burgers. Or better yet, that it is alright for a guy to serve you at the register, but if a girl is in the back area making the food, people ask what they are doing there.

Syl and Pen

We work on ads. And we were asked to come up with a cheat sheet on what it’s like to be a woman. We asked why they had 19 males in a department of 20 when they needed to advertising to female consumer. We no longer work there.

Cat Caller

I was 13 when I first got cat called by a old man,I laughed it off as I didn’t know what to do and my friends told me not to take it seriously,I was scared.Some women like to be cat called because it makes them feel sexy,I am disgusted in how many women like this type of stuff.To this day I am scared to walk alone.

Ailie

Being immediately perceived as personable, friendly and welcoming and being made to feel shame when I am not. Being asked if I am sick if I don’t wear makeup. Being told to shut up when discussing sexism experienced that day. Being called a slut. Being told my passion for equality is my inner desire to be a man. Being told my body hair is dirty. Being called a lesbian when I had short hair. Being referred to as a porn star when I have long hair. Being called ‘one of the boys’ when I have friendships with men. When my friends tell me about men following them home,propositioning them during work and continually making them feel uncomfortable in public places. Being choked during sex and then feeling shame when I didn’t like it. Being perceived as stupid by the colour of my hair. Not being allowed to be pretty and smart and funny all at the same time. Being unsuitable for manual labor. Being poor due to the cost of being a woman (razors,tampons,makeup,hair treatments, bras etc) Having to wake up 30 minutes before my male counterparts to get ‘ready’ for work. Constantly eating less and feeling guilt when I eat more. The list goes on and will go on… until we make a change. x

Eliza

I work at a shop that sells sweets. When I started I was given a choice of two work t-shirts, the first was plain white with two cakes circling the breasts and the second said “please stop drooling, my eyes are up here”. After getting cat-called at work most days, I refused to wear them. I’m not a walking advertisement, or a brand, or a body that can be sexualised to sell a product.

Anon

As a young girl if you are overweight you are taught straight away that you are not accepted by society. Not only are you mocked and told you are unattractive, the message is clear that you should strive to be objectified, because if you aren’t beautiful you are apparently worthless. It makes me wonder what is actually better? – being fat or skinny – having developed an eating disorder after years of taunting I have had the ‘privilege’ of experiencing both. Objectification on either side of the coin is confusing and degrading of ones self worth. Gaining strength to see yourself otherwise is a constant battle worth fighting as we deserve more.

JB

In my male dominated property course I used to sit with boys at lunch time and be subjected to them rating women passing by us on the sidewalk out of 10. Blatant objectification. I am so sad in a social setting amongst peers at an educational facility it is acceptable to pass on the message that women are apparently only valuable as objects.