The Everyday Sexism Project exists to catalogue instances of sexism experienced on a day to day basis. They might be serious or minor, outrageously offensive or so niggling and normalised that you don’t even feel able to protest. Say as much or as little as you like, use your real name or a pseudonym – it’s up to you. By sharing your story you’re showing the world that sexism does exist, it is faced by women everyday and it is a valid problem to discuss.

If you prefer to e-mail me at laura@everydaysexism.com I can upload your story for you instead. Follow us on Twitter (and submit entries by tweet) at @EverydaySexism.

Add your story:

Amy

On the train, man next to me joking with his friend about women being crap drivers, later says that he would like to see Karen Brady ‘with a rope around her neck’

Claire

‪Walking into Pret today I was behind 3 guys who stopped suddenly in front of me blocking most of the entrance. One of them turned around sharply and bashed into me, I was trying to get around him. No apology, instead all 3 of them just gave me a load of grief. My response was “that wasn’t the best place for you to stop”. They waited for me and I got further grief when I came back out. I wonder if it had been a man in my place would they have reacted differently. Should women not speak up perhaps? ‬

Hannah

I was babysitting a 7 and 9 year old pair of boys. The 7 year old started to explain to me that one of his male friends did something stupid, so he insulted him in the most powerful way he knew how – “I told him he was being SUCH a girl.” These two boys live in one of the wealthiest and highly educated parts of the US, which two highly educated and successful parents- one of whom happens to be a woman. If our society begins our young boys’ education by teaching them that the worst thing they could call someone is a girl, the association of anything related to begin a woman will always be akin to weakness, second class status, and misogyny. Being a girl or a woman is not an insult. The longer we condone this type of socialization, the more we fail our young men and women alike.

Celine

Many things have happened to me over the years, from being followed by a truck full of men when I was walking to my friend’s house at 13 years old to car horns, inappropriate comments, leers and screams throughout the years.

The time that will always stand out to me is when I went to a golf tournament. Two young men on a golf cart were making their way through the crowded walk way, I stepped aside to let them pass and one of them remarked as they drove by, “I would have hit you if you weren’t so beautiful,” I knew that to him my self worth, my life and safety is all dependent on my physical appearance, that if I wasn’t so “beautiful” he would have injured or killed me.

Nag I think NOT

This morning my husband made an ill timed comment about me being a nag and hen pecking him. A seemingly innocuous comment? I think not! The antagonistic comment stirred an inner fire in my belly of equality. He unleashed an oppressed beast of rage that has been harboring for 10 long years.
My crime, making a comment about my having to clean the dogs diarrhea off our bedspread.
I could enter into the much argued debate, that if the men in our lives actually addressed the imbalance of house hold chores I, we, women would not have to ‘nag’. I could highlight how frustrated I am that women “nag” and yet men “request”.
Not today, today I am fired up because his statement was made in front of our daughter. I will be damned if I will allow anyone in our house to teach my daughter that if she speaks up and uses her voice against a man that this is a negative quality. I will not stand for her to receive the message that women speaking their mind is a negative trait. That she should be submissive and not have a voice in her relationships. The fact that I can not stop media inaccurately portraying our strong women leaders “bossy”, “opinionated” or “nags” Is a very real shame. However I CAN stop my daughter receiving this message in her own house! Stand with me, raise strong daughters. I love my husband, but he picked the wrong language, wrong day!

phoebe

I am 17 years old and I live in Australia. Just this morning on the bus to school, I looked out the window beside me where a car was driving next to us on the road. In the car was an old man, in his late 60s. His penis was right out and he was stroking it while looking into my bus full of school girls. I didn’t know what to do, I just kept staring, I couldn’t believe that this was actually happening. He made eye contact with me and then sped off. My little sister, who is only 11, was sitting next to me and thank God she hadn’t seen what I had seen.

Helena

I have a part time job as a temp while I’m at university, and the first time I met the CEO was at the Christmas Lunch. He said ‘Hello, who are you?’ I told him my name and said ‘I’m a temp for marketing,’ to which he replied ‘oh no no, I think you’ll be an intern. It sounds sexier.’ It hadn’t even occurred to him that that’s not part of my job description, and that it would make me very uncomfortable; he didn’t see anything wrong with it at all.

Fortunately I was quickly reassured by others to dismiss this idea, but his general lack of awareness or consideration about what is appropriate and how he is perceiving and treating his employees (not even his equals which is bad enough but the inferiors he has authority over!) highlights an underlying, and far too easily dismissible, sexism which I am finding increasingly difficult to call out and get people to acknowledge or change. Constantly being called ‘sweetie’ or ‘love’ by random strangers; made to move through doors by men with good intentions who nevertheless can’t see it’s far more convenient to just carry on holding it for them; being beeped walking down a street and wondering if something’s gone wrong with my clothing- at times school uniform- to find, no, it’s just being casually sexualised; all experiences which we know are absolutely not uncommon at all.

Sam

The past couple of years I was with this really awesome guy. He is a total sweetheart and wonderful in many ways but even HE was a sexist moron at times.

During discussions on feminism he’d tell me that while he agreed in gender equality he wouldn’t consider himself a feminist because ‘feminists are just too angry, they can’t be reasonable’. I tried to explain as calmly and clearly where that anger comes from but A) he refused to accept that there was any reason for being angry and B) he couldn’t see why, ‘even in the unlikely even that what you’re saying is true’ that anger should even be allowed to enter into the discussions. ‘It’s just not logical! It’s going too far!’
He just didn’t seem to understand why it was difficult for me to be totally logical and clear in these discussions. What a lovely privilaged position that is.

Same boyfriend asked me what happened to me in India (I’d previously alluded to something nasty that had happened when I lived there) and, having heard my explanation (Vagina grope/ attempts at digital penetration in the middle of the day on a busy street) asked me to stop talking about it and never bring it up again (?) cos he couldn’t handle hearing about it.

Same boyfriend eventually dumped me because (this is classic), he couldn’t handle how many guys I’d slept with in the past. Including him, 11. Only 4 more than women he’d slept with. I’d never even flirted with another guy while I was with him. Called me a whore, said it disgusted him, and that he couldn’t deal with it, why hadn’t I thought about him (future, unknown, unmet boyfriend), before I slept with anyone else. Couldn’t even begin to accept that this was misogyny.

To be clear, this guy is a really nice guy and our relationship was as good as I have ever seen, it looked like a match made in heaven – apart from these bits. That the best guy I’ve ever met ended a relationship because, before him I had a short period of one night stands is deeply distressing.

Marilyn

Landlord comes over to look at our broken fridge, sees our shelf of craft beer, proceeds to enthusiastically discuss different breweries with my male partner, not even registering the possibility that the beer might not be his.